Archive for July, 2013

Eat to Stop the Sniffles

seasonal allergies, sniffles, itchy eyes, nasal congestion, food allergies,

Certain foods may influence symptoms of seasonal allergies.

People who suffer from seasonal allergies can almost set their clocks to when when their itchy eyes and stuffy noses will start due to blooming plants, trees and grasses. They will stock up on allergy medicine and saline spray in hopes of staving off irritating symptoms.

Studies have shown that a trip to the grocery store may also be in order for people with seasonal allergies.

“Certain foods have been shown to help alleviate some allergy symptoms,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center, in Lady Lake, Florida. “Sipping some tea or eating warm fluids is always good for breaking up congestion in your airways.”

Research has also shown eating fish with healthy omega-3 fatty acids and yogurt with probiotics may help ease symptoms. Similarly, Neuzil tells his patients to avoid certain foods which can exacerbate allergy symptoms.

“Some fruits and vegetables contain proteins that are similar to those in certain pollens which trigger allergic reactions” said Neuzil. “For example, if you’re allergic to ragweed, you may experience similar symptoms when you eat melons or tomatoes because their proteins mirror each other.”

For some people, drinking alcohol may cause nasal congestion so it may be a good idea to refrain from beer or wine if allergy season is your sniffle season. And some people with food allergies may experience a stuffy nose when they consume certain trigger foods.

If your allergies are affecting the quality of your life, consider speaking with a medical practitioner about being tested to potentially identify foods that may make you sneeze. Check out this Hometown Health TV video to learn more about the allergy testing process.

Advertisements

Correct Use of Nasal Spray

Rinsing your nasal passages of the dirt, pollen and other irritants that cause discomfort is a proven to help prevent symptoms related to allergies, colds and other sinus conditions.nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray,

“Many people turn to nasal irrigation and use a Neti pot or sinus rinse for relief,” says Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and founder of herbal-enhanced Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray. “But for those who are adverse to the potential messiness and discomfort from nasal flushing, using a non-medicated, herbal enhanced saline based spray can be just as or more effective, better tolerated with less messiness. The trick is using the spray correctly.”

  • When first using any nasal spray, be sure to prime the pump by pulling down several times or squeeze the bottle until spray is ejected from the nozzle. This is only necessary with the first use of a new bottle or when the bottle has not been used in a while.
  • Tilt your head slightly forward and close one nostril by gently pressing against the side of your nose with your finger.
  • Then gently insert nozzle into nostril. Slightly point the tip toward the outer aspect of the eye on the same side so that the spray will enter the nasal passages. Be sure that the nozzle is positioned so that it will spray directly into the nasal passages and not up into the tip of your nose.
  • Firmly pull down on the pump or squeeze the bottle for a burst of mist. Then inhale gently through the nose to distribute spray deeper into nasal passages.
  • Repeat with other nostril.
  • When finished, wipe off the nozzle with a tissue; replace any cover or plastic cap to protect from contamination and accidental leaks.

If you are using the nasal spray correctly, the liquid should not drip from your nose or down the back of your throat,” says Neuzil.

Neuzil also stresses that the nasal spray bottle is a personal use item and should not be shared with others so as not to spread germs. It should also not be refilled with any other liquid for reasons of sanitation.

Fires Can Fuel Smoke Allergies

smoke inhalation, sinusitis, sinus irritation, Dr. Neuzil's Irrigator, saline rinseSummertime brings an increased risk for wildfires in parts of the United States. Firefighters in western states are already battling blazes while others regions are on high alert for potential flare-ups.

Loss of life and property are the greatest concerns for areas of immediate threat but the effects of wildfires can be far-reaching especially for people who suffer from smoke allergies and asthma.

Dry, windy conditions help spread the smoke over hundreds of miles and carry pollutants that cause sinus and respiratory irritation. Consider that the smoke may contain chemicals from man-made materials which increase the risk for people susceptible to adverse reactions.

The wind may also carry pollen which further contributes to discomfort and can cause serious breathing issues.

Doctors stress the importance of staying indoors when smoke is heavy in your area. If that is not possible, consider wearing a mask.

Once exposed to smoke, it is important to wash your hair and clothes as soon as possible as remnants will remain. Also use a sinus rinse to get rid of any airborne pollutants you have inhaled that could be trapped in your nasal passages.