Archive for the ‘Allergies’ Category

Avoid Holiday Sniffles

Having a runny nose certainly does not inspire holiday cheer. But a bout of the sniffles can be quite common during this season…and they can be avoided.

According to The Christmas Tree Association, researchers found that conifers can carry mold that cause allergic reactions in some people.

The suggest shaking out as much debris as possible out of the tree before bringing it inside. Another option is to decorate your home with an artificial tree.

christmas tree, tree pollen, allergies, sniffles.

The holidays can often be filled with allergic triggers that lead to sniffles.

When it’s time to store away your holiday decorations, be sure to wipe everything before you store them and when you unpack next Christmas-time so dust won’t irritate your sinuses.

If you like the smell of the holiday, take note before you use artificial sprays and candles. Those strong smells can also trigger sneezing and sniffles so you might want to tone them down a little, especially if your holiday guests seem uncomfortable.

Eliminating exposure to these potential triggers is the best way to avoid allergic reactions. One way is to use a nasal rinse after exposure to airborne pollutants to get rid of the irritants in your nose.

Using an herbal-enhanced nasal spray before you are potentially exposed to the airborne irritants at a holiday party will even help protect your sinuses by moisturizing passages so that you can focus on holiday cheer instead of holiday sniffles.

 

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How does a Nasal Decongestant Help?

When allergies strike, there are many options available for getting relief from the nasal congestion and itchy sinuses that cause discomfort. While the symptoms are similar to that of a cold, allergic rhinitis or hay fever can sometimes be a chronic problem that flares up throughout the year.

According to the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology, allergic rhinitis affects between 10% and 30% of adults and as many as 40% of children.

Medical professionals may recommend medicated decongestants that come in the form of a tablet, liquid or even a nasal spray.

saline nasal spray, irritated sinuses,

A saline nasal spray can help soothe irritated sinuses in children without concern about side effects from medicine.

The spray bottle tips are inserted in the each nostril and liquid is dispensed with a pump or squeeze of the bottle.  The user then inhales the liquid and should soon feel their nasal passages opening up so that they can breathe better.

Non-medicated nasal saline sprays are often prescribed by medical professionals in order to cleanse the nasal passages of the dirt, pollen and irritants that cause discomfort. These rinses, usually comprised of purified water and salt, can be administered the same way and the irritants flushed from the nose providing relief.

Some saline nasal rinses have added natural ingredients which can help moisturize your sinuses or even provide a refreshing feeling. These saline sprays can be used without worry of addiction and can even be supplements to medication prescribed by your doctor.

What are grass allergies?

During warm weather, our dog likes to spend time sitting in the grass under a shade tree. Sometimes, she’ll be allergies, grass pollenoutside for hours. We suspect she loves it because often she’ll stare blankly at us when we try to coax her indoors.

Once inside, however, the licking begins. Our dog is likely allergic to grass pollen. Seasonal allergies are common in pets but symptoms flare as skin irritation instead of the sneezing and itchy, watery eyes that humans experience.

Grass allergy season is strongest in late spring and summer. The pollen can be spread by wind and when the lawn is mowed. One challenge with grass is that airborne pollen from other plants can fall onto blades of grass and slide into the ground where it can stick to shoes or paws and be brought into the house.

If you or your child plays sports outside in the grass, you’re likely to get stuck with something irritating that could make you sneeze. And the skin irritation that animals experience? Humans can react that way as well. Some people will break out in hives and, in rare cases, can even have an anaphylactic reaction.

“Grass is hard to avoid so it’s important to recognize the allergy and be prepared for symptoms,” says Ed Neuzil, Jr., ARNP-BC, PhD, FAANP and owner of the Allergy,

Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Fla. “The best way to stay symptom-free is to avoid exposure and stay inside. However, an over-the-counter anti-histamine can provide relief if you so start to experience a runny nose, itchy eyes or skin irritation.”

Neuzil also suggested taking off your shoes once in the house so you don’t track it throughout and also consider washing your clothes and hair once inside to rinse out any irritants that may stick to you. And your pets? Wash their paws, too.

 

Why am I sneezing during Christmas?

We look forward to the holidays for so many reasons: the smell of a Christmas tree, a warm, cozy fire and delicious food to name a few.

For some allergy sufferers, these aromatic symbols of the season can actually make you say “ahchoo” instead of “Ho, Ho, Ho.”

  • According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, many people experience sniffling,
    Christmas tree allergies, mold, conifer trees, fragrance allergies, sniffles, sneezing

    Mold spores may be the other “gifts” found under your Christmas tree.

    itchy eyes and nose, and shortness of breath due to a Christmas tree allergy. That’s because some conifer trees carry mold spores that trigger allergic reactions or even asthma. Experts recommend putting the tree in the garage or an enclosed porch for several days until it dries. Give it a good shake outside before bringing it in to decorate.

  • Some will artificial sprays and candles to enhance holiday fragrances. But those strong smells can also trigger sneezing and sniffles so you might want to tone them down a little, especially if your holiday guests seem uncomfortable.
  • Many people may not realize that smoke from a fireplace or wood-burning stove is air pollution. The tiny smoke particles which are inhaled may cause coughing and congestion and can even affect your lungs.
  • Delicious holiday meals may be filled with certain foods that trigger allergies. Because a person may react with sniffles, sneezing and coughing after eating a meal, they may not realize they have food allergies.

Using an herbal-enhanced nasal spray before you are potentially exposed to the airborne irritants at a holiday party will even help protect your sinuses by moisturizing passages so that you can focus on holiday cheer instead of holiday achoo. If symptoms persist, consider seeking help from a medical professional.

 

What’s the right way to blow your nose?

Certain sounds are associated with seasons. You hear jingle bells in the winter, birds chirping in spring and kids yelling with delight when school is out marks that summer is here.

Aside from the rustle of falling leaves, you’ll also hear a lot more sniffles this time of year due to colds, the flu and fall allergies.

Of course, blowing the nose helps with this symptom. But is it always a good thing?

seasonal allergies, sinus conditions, pollen counts, nasal irrigation

There’s a right way and a wrong way to blow your nose.

The truth is that ignoring nasal symptoms such as congestion, sneezing, runny nose or thick nasal discharge can lead to other problems:

  • Nasal congestion reduces the sense of smell.
  • When you can’t breathe through your nose, you resort to mouth breathing which can increase the risk of mouth and throat infections. Mouth breathing also pulls all the pollution and airborne germs directly into the lungs.
  • Breathing cold dry air into the lungs will make secretions thick, slows the cleaning cilia as well as the passage of oxygen into the blood stream.

So, yes, blowing your nose is important but there is a right and wrong way to do it.  If you blow too hard, you’ll cause pressure and some mucus to build up in the sinus cavities. That may lead to further infection.

According to experts, the proper method is to blow one nostril at a time, gently. You should also use a saline nasal rinse to remove excess mucous.

If the congestion lingers for a long time or develops into something more, that’s the time to visit your medical practitioner for a consult.

 

 

How can I help my child’s sniffles?

With children being back at school, there’s a good chance you’ll hear more sniffles. Colds are spread easily in a school child sniffles, allergies, coldssetting.

Plus, the fall season can bring a new host of allergens and with the kids spending more time outside, they’ll be exposed to allergic triggers.

Children who are suffering from nasal congestion should clean the nasal passages using a saline rinse. A Neti pot or similar sinus rinses can be effective although possibly messy and unpleasant for a youngster.

A saline nasal spray can be very effective and you can find products that have essential oils added to make the treatment more pleasant while moisturizing nasal passages.  The additional moisture will help preserve the natural protectants in your child’s nose.

Show your child how to safely and carefully insert the nasal spray bottle into her nose and to distribute the spray effectively.  Make sure she uses a tissue to wipe her nose afterwards and, of course, wash hands afterwards.

Non-medicated nasal saline sprays can be used frequently throughout the day to provide relief but consult with your pediatrician about how often it can be used.

And if you use a medicated treatment to alleviate symptoms, the non-medicated saline spray can be used in conjunction without fear of interaction.

Saline Spray for Pollen Tsunami

allergies, sneezing, saline spray, non-medicated, snifflesAcross much of the nation, many are suffering from the effects of the “pollen tsunami.” Plants and trees are blooming spreading allergy-inducing particles all over.

When suffering allergies, the key to relief is often just clearing out your nasal passages. Nasal decongestant sprays have medication that will dry out your nasal passages and reduce the swelling that causes congestion. But repeated use of a spray with chemicals can cause damage.

Saline nasal sprays, which commonly consist of a salt water solution, will clean out the nasal airways, moisturize the dry passages and can help improve the function of the mucous membranes which actually help protect your body from germs. The ingredients in the saline spray mirrors the natural components in your body.

There are typically no side effects with nasal saline sprays and the sprays will not interact with medications you might be taking. You can use a nasal saline spray alone or as a supplement to medication in order to provide additional relief in between doses.

Saline nasal sprays can even be used by children. Of course, it’s important to discuss usage with your medical practitioner before beginning treatment.