Archive for the ‘natural health solutions’ Category

Correct Use of Nasal Spray

Rinsing your nasal passages of the dirt, pollen and other irritants that cause discomfort is a proven to help prevent symptoms related to allergies, colds and other sinus conditions.nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray,

“Many people turn to nasal irrigation and use a Neti pot or sinus rinse for relief,” says Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and founder of herbal-enhanced Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray. “But for those who are adverse to the potential messiness and discomfort from nasal flushing, using a non-medicated, herbal enhanced saline based spray can be just as or more effective, better tolerated with less messiness. The trick is using the spray correctly.”

  • When first using any nasal spray, be sure to prime the pump by pulling down several times or squeeze the bottle until spray is ejected from the nozzle. This is only necessary with the first use of a new bottle or when the bottle has not been used in a while.
  • Tilt your head slightly forward and close one nostril by gently pressing against the side of your nose with your finger.
  • Then gently insert nozzle into nostril. Slightly point the tip toward the outer aspect of the eye on the same side so that the spray will enter the nasal passages. Be sure that the nozzle is positioned so that it will spray directly into the nasal passages and not up into the tip of your nose.
  • Firmly pull down on the pump or squeeze the bottle for a burst of mist. Then inhale gently through the nose to distribute spray deeper into nasal passages.
  • Repeat with other nostril.
  • When finished, wipe off the nozzle with a tissue; replace any cover or plastic cap to protect from contamination and accidental leaks.

If you are using the nasal spray correctly, the liquid should not drip from your nose or down the back of your throat,” says Neuzil.

Neuzil also stresses that the nasal spray bottle is a personal use item and should not be shared with others so as not to spread germs. It should also not be refilled with any other liquid for reasons of sanitation.

Sniffle insurance for uninterrupted summer travel.

Surely you’ve experienced this.

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Airplanes can be like flying petri dishes because people travel with germs that can be dispersed throughout the cabin.

You’ve been anticipating a getaway. The time has arrived. Your bags are packed and you’re ready to go. Then something happens that can ruin your trip. You’re sneezing, eyes are itchy, and sinuses are clogged.

You are allergic to your dream destination.

Pollen, dust, mold spores, air pollution, etc. all cause nasal irritation, making you miserable. You run to a drugstore to get allergy medicine; but that may make you drowsy or feel out of it.

It’s no way to sight-see.

Removing irritants that cause discomfort can provide relief. Nasal irrigation – as gross as it sounds – is a long-used, effective therapy.

Few anticipate feeling lousy while on vacation or a business trip. Arming yourself is easy and you’ll be glad you are prepared. Traveling with kids? Ditto x 10.

  • Don’t leave home without it: Travelers should consider the “blooming” seasons of your destinations when making plans. Be sure to pack items that will help with relief:  tissues, nasal irrigation, laundry soap to wash clothes that get particles trapped in the weave, hand sanitizer, etc.
  • Give me moisture: The dry air in-flight or visits to high altitudes can really leave nasal passages parched and irritated. Swollen sinuses can cause additional discomfort due to the change in pressure during takeoff and landing.  A couple of sprays of an herbal enhanced nasal spray will soothe and moisturize your nose making it easier to breath. Its essential oils will help open you up, too, relieving pressure.
  • Flying Petri dish prophylactics:  Your nose has natural protectants which help fight airborne bacteria and germs. When nasal passages are dried out, as when you’re on an airplane, those natural protectants don’t work as well. By moisturizing nasal passages, you can help ward off the germs your fellow passengers brought on board with them. Saline nasal sprays can help. Also, drink lots of water, bring a mask to wear, and antiseptic wipes for surfaces you’ll touch.

 

How are you treating Allergic Rhinitis?

nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray, The first step to manage this condition is to avoid allergens that cause symptoms. For instance, if you are allergic to dust mites, it is important to take steps to prevent exposure to dust mites, such as frequently washing bed linens in hot water. The same is true for outdoor allergens. Limiting your exposure during times of high pollen and mold counts may help reduce symptoms.

Nasal corticosteroid sprays (i.e. Flonase® or Nasonex®) treat inflammation and reduce all symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including itching, sneezing, runny nose and stuffiness. Antihistamines (i.e. Benadryl®) in the form of liquid, pills or nasal sprays block histamine and may relieve itching, sneezing and runny nose. But they may not be as effective in reducing nasal stuffiness. Anti-leukotrienes (i.e. Singulair® or Accolate®) in pill form can also reduce the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

Decongestant pills or nasal sprays can be used as needed if nasal stuffiness is not relieved with other medications. Decongestant nasal sprays should not be used for long periods of time because they can cause your congestion to return and worsen. In fact a new website, www.NoseSprayAddiction.com has helpful information for people who have become addicted to certain medicated nasal sprays.

Consider another alternative. Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients with chronic sinus or rhinitis problems without the use of medication.

If you suffer from chronic or acute sinus infections, sinus rinses can be helpful in removing and thinning out excessive mucus. If you have allergic rhinitis, these rinses can bring relief by removing allergens from the nostrils and sinuses.

Your medical practitioner may recommend allergy testing and if appropriate allergy shots if your symptoms are constant, if you do not want to take medications or feel that they are not enough, or if you want long-term control of your allergies with less need for medications. This treatment involves allergy testing to determine your allergic triggers and receiving injections periodically—as determined by your practitioner—over a period of three to five years.

2013 Resolution? Get Better Sleep.

snoring, sleep apnea, trouble sleeping, sinus passages, saline nasal spray, nasal obstructions, A column in today’s newspaper cited several local community leaders who shared their New Year’s resolution plans. Surprisingly, many said they will try to get a better night’s sleep in addition to the usual “lose weight and exercise more.”

There is no disputing the health benefits of getting enough sleep. What many may not know is how one’s weight and health can influence how you sleep.

According to Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Florida, sinus obstructions can make it difficult to breathe at night whether caused by colds, allergies, and other nasal obstructions.

“When you have to breathe through your mouth while sleeping, it prevents your nose from filtering and moistening the air you breathe which can lead to sleep disturbance,” said Neuzil. In addition to infections or allergies which cause nasal blockage, excess weight can be a factor.

“The extra weight crowds your airway and interrupts the flow of air,” explains Neuzil. “In some extreme cases, it can result in pauses in breathing called ‘apnea’ and can lead to many other health problems.”

If you are sick, have allergies or suffer from other factors which affect breathing, the potential for sleep disturbance intensifies.

Neuzil’s encourages adding the following to your 2013 resolutions to help reach the goal of more restful sleep:

  • Avoid exposure to allergic triggers which means keeping pets out of your bedroom, washing bedding regularly to get rid of dust mites and staying inside when pollen peaks.
  • Use an herbal-enhanced saline nasal spray before bed to help soothe and moisturize your nasal passages. The spray will also open up your sinuses so that you are more likely to breathe through your nose, as intended, instead of your mouth.
  • Make lifestyle changes so that you eat healthier, stay active and lose weight.
  • If sleep disturbances continue, see a practitioner to address any medical issues which could be contributing to your problems.

 

 

Sorting Out Saline

A staple for the medicine cabinet during the holiday season (or even year round) should be  a saline spray to help with any sinus issues related to congestion and irritation due to colds, allergies, inhaled pollutants or a chronic nasal condition.

Saline solution is a sterile mix of salt and water. But did you know there are different types of saline? Which one is best to use?

First, it is important to know that salt or sodium is very important for normal nerve and muscle function and is required to maintain normal fluid balance in and around the body’s cells. When sodium levels become too high or too low, it can cause imbalance which may lead to disease.

Isotonic or normal saline is the main saline used intravenously because it has the same salinity or level of salt as bodily fluids. It closely mirrors the sodium that is in the body’s cells and is also used in some nasal sprays to relieve sinus congestion and pressure.

Hypertonic saline has higher salt levels than normal bodily fluids. It may be used intravenously to treat spider and varicose veins because the additional salt causes blood cells to shrink. It may also be used to treat people with edema or cystic fibrosis. Some nasal sprays have hyertonic saline because it is thought to reduce swelling of the mucous membranes.

Hypotonic saline solution has less salt than normal body fluids and is used to treat infections, often intravenously.

There are other saline solutions—Ringer Gleichenberger and Ems̶ that contain additives and are often used as nasal sprays and washes.

For some people, a hypertonic solution will more likely dry out nasal passages when used as a rinse, whereas the isotonic solution helps restore moisture.

It’s best to consult with your medical practitioner if you have a chronic sinus condition to know which type of saline is best to use for nasal therapy.

Nature’s Germ Killers

Cold and flu season has everyone on edge. We are afraid to touch anything because of the potential for lurking germs.

Doctors always warn us to wash our hands frequently and many people arm themselves with anti-bacterial lotion and squirt and wipe all day long.

Now, researchers are concerned that overusing antibacterial soap can be dangerous because when so many people use the gels, bacteria develop stronger strains that become resistant to antibiotics.

Lucky for us, Mother Nature has provided us with some natural germ killers which can help us fight off germs and stay healthy without chemicals.

A number of natural essential oils have antibacterial and anti septic properties. Essential oils are made from plants and are commonly used for their scent and in some foods.

Aromatherapy uses essential oils, often to make you feel relaxed and to eliminate stress. But when introduced into your system, some of these essential oils have a greater benefit:

Essential oils of cinnamon, eucalyptus, and pine have antibacterial properties which help kill bacteria.

Camphor, eucalyptus, ginger, peppermint and thyme are antiseptic which means they inhibit the growth and reproduction of microorganisms including bacteria and viruses.

A number of personal care products are available that are enhanced with natural germ fighters and you should consult with your medical practitioner about using them. Combined with other precautions that you should take during the cold and flu season such as a healthy diet, exercise and plenty of sleep to keep your immune system working well, these essential oils may help prevent illness.

Of course, make an appointment with your doctor if you really start to feel badly.

Sniffling and sneezing? You might blame your parents.

Do your sinuses flare up at the slightest exposure to pollen, dust or mold spores? It is likely due to an allergic reaction where the human immune system overreacts to a foreign substance that is eaten, inhaled, injected or touched.

The immune reaction may cause symptoms such as coughing, sneezing, itchy eyes, runny nose and a scratchy throat. In severe cases, inhaling these allergens can cause asthma attacks, difficulty breathing or worse.

If this diagnosis is familiar to you, there is a good possibility that one or both of your parents share the same problem.

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, allergies have a genetic component. In fact, if only one parent has allergies of any type, the likelihood of each child having an allergy is 1 in 3.  If both parents have allergies, the likelihood of the children having the allergies increases to 7 in 10.

“If your allergies are severe,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, MSN, PhD and founder of Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray. “Then you’ll want to visit your medical practitioner and try to determine what allergens prompt your discomfort. Once you find out, it will be important to try to avoid exposure to those pollutants as much as possible.”

allergies, sneezing, saline spray, non-medicated, snifflesWhat is that old saying? “A family that sticks together, sniffles together?”