Archive for the ‘saline spray’ Category

Antibiotics prescribed less? Consider pumping up saline spray usage to prevent illness.

This week, the Centers for Disease Control issued a report that further backs concerns from medical practitioners over-prescribing antibiotics because of the potential for “super bugs” which become resistant to medication.  Officials urge more diligence in preventing the spread of infection while encouraging practitioners to avoid prescribing antibiotics unless absolutely necessary.

In the past few years, some medical professionals have been stingier about prescribing antibiotics for symptoms associated with virus-related colds, sore throats and respiratory infections because the medications are only effective with bacteria-borne illness.

If not antibiotics, then what? A saline spray can help ease symptoms associated with colds and viruses which include nasal congestion and irritated sinuses by rinsing away the thick nasal mucus.

nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray, When seeing patients at his own allergy, sinus and asthma practice in Central Florida, Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and developer of Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray (http://www.IrrigatorNasalSpray.com) will often encourage patients to use a nasal rinse with natural essential oils and herbal enhancements to:

  • Reduce congestion and cough associated with thick nasal mucus and post nasal drainage;
  • Soothe irritated sinuses;
  • Moisturize nasal passages thereby preserving natural protectants in our noses.

“Think of the saline spray as irrigating out the bad stuff that can lead to discomfort,” said Neuzil. “When the mucous is gone and the sinus irritation improved, the patient feels better.  A sinus spray is especially good for children because it is better tolerated than I sinus rinse, safe and non-irritating.”

Neuzil encourages his patients to regularly rinse their nose with the herbal-enhanced saline spray even when they’re not sick, as a preventative measure against illness.

  • It will rinse out dust, pollen, pet dander and other potential allergic triggers which cause sinus irritation and often lead to congestion, cough, itchy eyes, etc.
  • The spray will moisturize nasal passages thereby preserving the cilia or tiny hairs in the nose which trap airborne germs and irritants.
  • Saline sprays will help open up nasal passages so patients breathe easier throughout the day.

Dealing with Sinusitis

In the last couple of weeks, I’ve come across several people who have been suffering from, or cared for someone suffering from a “summer cold.”

When the weather is warm and inviting and vacations are planned, the last thing you want is to be is sick in bed with nasal congestion, headaches and fever.

The danger of a simple cold is that it can develop into the more serious and uncomfortable Sinusitis which is a swelling of the nasal passages.

Infection or other triggers can cause your sinuses to inflame causing a stuffy nose and pain. It may also lead to postnasal drip which can irritate the back of the throat.

While many things can cause sinusitis, the disease generally falls into two categories. Acute or Chronic.

Acute sinusitis is more common and generally the result of a viral or bacterial infection. Cold and flu-like symptoms usually persist for a few weeks and are often treated with painkillers, decongestants, nasal sprays and sometimes antibiotics.

Chronic sinusitis is diagnosed when an infection lasts 12 weeks or longer and may even last months if not properly treated. Sufferers often experience loss of smell, along with nasal discharge and halitosis.

“One of the first lines of defense should be use of a nasal spray or rinse to help clean out your nasal passages,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and founder of Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray. “Your medical practitioner may recommend a medicated spray which will help reduce inflammation but there are natural properties that can help as well.”

Essential oils such as eucalyptol and pine oil are known to be anti-inflammatory and will soothe swollen tissue.

“If you do use an over-the-counter nasal decongestant, follow the medications instructions carefully to limit use after three days,” encourages Neuzil. “If your symptoms persist, you should call your health care provider to avoid the condition from worsening.”

Eat to Stop the Sniffles

seasonal allergies, sniffles, itchy eyes, nasal congestion, food allergies,

Certain foods may influence symptoms of seasonal allergies.

People who suffer from seasonal allergies can almost set their clocks to when when their itchy eyes and stuffy noses will start due to blooming plants, trees and grasses. They will stock up on allergy medicine and saline spray in hopes of staving off irritating symptoms.

Studies have shown that a trip to the grocery store may also be in order for people with seasonal allergies.

“Certain foods have been shown to help alleviate some allergy symptoms,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center, in Lady Lake, Florida. “Sipping some tea or eating warm fluids is always good for breaking up congestion in your airways.”

Research has also shown eating fish with healthy omega-3 fatty acids and yogurt with probiotics may help ease symptoms. Similarly, Neuzil tells his patients to avoid certain foods which can exacerbate allergy symptoms.

“Some fruits and vegetables contain proteins that are similar to those in certain pollens which trigger allergic reactions” said Neuzil. “For example, if you’re allergic to ragweed, you may experience similar symptoms when you eat melons or tomatoes because their proteins mirror each other.”

For some people, drinking alcohol may cause nasal congestion so it may be a good idea to refrain from beer or wine if allergy season is your sniffle season. And some people with food allergies may experience a stuffy nose when they consume certain trigger foods.

If your allergies are affecting the quality of your life, consider speaking with a medical practitioner about being tested to potentially identify foods that may make you sneeze. Check out this Hometown Health TV video to learn more about the allergy testing process.

Correct Use of Nasal Spray

Rinsing your nasal passages of the dirt, pollen and other irritants that cause discomfort is a proven to help prevent symptoms related to allergies, colds and other sinus conditions.nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray,

“Many people turn to nasal irrigation and use a Neti pot or sinus rinse for relief,” says Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and founder of herbal-enhanced Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray. “But for those who are adverse to the potential messiness and discomfort from nasal flushing, using a non-medicated, herbal enhanced saline based spray can be just as or more effective, better tolerated with less messiness. The trick is using the spray correctly.”

  • When first using any nasal spray, be sure to prime the pump by pulling down several times or squeeze the bottle until spray is ejected from the nozzle. This is only necessary with the first use of a new bottle or when the bottle has not been used in a while.
  • Tilt your head slightly forward and close one nostril by gently pressing against the side of your nose with your finger.
  • Then gently insert nozzle into nostril. Slightly point the tip toward the outer aspect of the eye on the same side so that the spray will enter the nasal passages. Be sure that the nozzle is positioned so that it will spray directly into the nasal passages and not up into the tip of your nose.
  • Firmly pull down on the pump or squeeze the bottle for a burst of mist. Then inhale gently through the nose to distribute spray deeper into nasal passages.
  • Repeat with other nostril.
  • When finished, wipe off the nozzle with a tissue; replace any cover or plastic cap to protect from contamination and accidental leaks.

If you are using the nasal spray correctly, the liquid should not drip from your nose or down the back of your throat,” says Neuzil.

Neuzil also stresses that the nasal spray bottle is a personal use item and should not be shared with others so as not to spread germs. It should also not be refilled with any other liquid for reasons of sanitation.

Fires Can Fuel Smoke Allergies

smoke inhalation, sinusitis, sinus irritation, Dr. Neuzil's Irrigator, saline rinseSummertime brings an increased risk for wildfires in parts of the United States. Firefighters in western states are already battling blazes while others regions are on high alert for potential flare-ups.

Loss of life and property are the greatest concerns for areas of immediate threat but the effects of wildfires can be far-reaching especially for people who suffer from smoke allergies and asthma.

Dry, windy conditions help spread the smoke over hundreds of miles and carry pollutants that cause sinus and respiratory irritation. Consider that the smoke may contain chemicals from man-made materials which increase the risk for people susceptible to adverse reactions.

The wind may also carry pollen which further contributes to discomfort and can cause serious breathing issues.

Doctors stress the importance of staying indoors when smoke is heavy in your area. If that is not possible, consider wearing a mask.

Once exposed to smoke, it is important to wash your hair and clothes as soon as possible as remnants will remain. Also use a sinus rinse to get rid of any airborne pollutants you have inhaled that could be trapped in your nasal passages.

Safe from Smog

For many families, summertime offers the chance to explore new places.

It is also a time of year when certain regions and cities are prone to high smog levels which can cause or aggravate health problems such as asthma, emphysema, chronic bronchitis as well as eye irritation and reduced resistance to colds and lung infections.

smog, air pollution, air qualitySmog is an accumulation of greenhouse gases and pollution. During summer smog is worse because ozone, which is the main component of smog, increases production in strong sunlight.

The chemical gases and air pollutants in smog irritates respiratory organs and long-term exposure to smog can lead to various diseases. When traveling with children, especially ones with asthma, it is important to take precautions in locations prone to high levels of smog.

  • Stay indoors on heavy smog days.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise which causes you to breathe deeply thereby drawing pollutants deep into your lungs.
  • Use a saline rinse after being in the outdoors to get rid of any inhalants that could cause irritation.

Check for air quality alerts for your destination by visiting AirNow.gov so that you can plan accordingly for your visit.

Sniffle insurance for uninterrupted summer travel.

Surely you’ve experienced this.

airplane travel, nasal spray, nasal irrigation, saline spray, herbal-enhanced, dehydrated,

Airplanes can be like flying petri dishes because people travel with germs that can be dispersed throughout the cabin.

You’ve been anticipating a getaway. The time has arrived. Your bags are packed and you’re ready to go. Then something happens that can ruin your trip. You’re sneezing, eyes are itchy, and sinuses are clogged.

You are allergic to your dream destination.

Pollen, dust, mold spores, air pollution, etc. all cause nasal irritation, making you miserable. You run to a drugstore to get allergy medicine; but that may make you drowsy or feel out of it.

It’s no way to sight-see.

Removing irritants that cause discomfort can provide relief. Nasal irrigation – as gross as it sounds – is a long-used, effective therapy.

Few anticipate feeling lousy while on vacation or a business trip. Arming yourself is easy and you’ll be glad you are prepared. Traveling with kids? Ditto x 10.

  • Don’t leave home without it: Travelers should consider the “blooming” seasons of your destinations when making plans. Be sure to pack items that will help with relief:  tissues, nasal irrigation, laundry soap to wash clothes that get particles trapped in the weave, hand sanitizer, etc.
  • Give me moisture: The dry air in-flight or visits to high altitudes can really leave nasal passages parched and irritated. Swollen sinuses can cause additional discomfort due to the change in pressure during takeoff and landing.  A couple of sprays of an herbal enhanced nasal spray will soothe and moisturize your nose making it easier to breath. Its essential oils will help open you up, too, relieving pressure.
  • Flying Petri dish prophylactics:  Your nose has natural protectants which help fight airborne bacteria and germs. When nasal passages are dried out, as when you’re on an airplane, those natural protectants don’t work as well. By moisturizing nasal passages, you can help ward off the germs your fellow passengers brought on board with them. Saline nasal sprays can help. Also, drink lots of water, bring a mask to wear, and antiseptic wipes for surfaces you’ll touch.