Posts Tagged ‘Ed Neuzil’

Nasal Congestion Remedies

Between the fall allergies and start of the cold season, many are suffering.  The runny noses, stuffy heads and sneezing can make it hard to function.

To get immediate relief, try flushing the mucous out of your nose using a saline rinse,” says Ed Neuzil, PhD, MSN, ARNP, FAANP and owner of the Allergy Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Florida. “Whether using a neti-pot, over-the-counter saline rinse system or a nasal spray, you can effectively relieve much of the stuffiness and discomfort.”

Medicated saline sprays and drops will help reduce swollen membranes but medical practitioners warn that excessive use can actually worsen congestion.

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A little bit of exercise can temporarily alleviate nasal congestion

There are plenty of natural saline sprays that have been enhanced with herbs and essential oils. They are effective in rinsing out sinus passages while the natural additives can moisturize your nasal passages while even providing a decongesting effect. Best of all, they are not addictive and can be used frequently or can even compliment medicated options.

Neuzil says using a humidifier at night can make it easier to breathe. Add a few drops of eucalyptus oil to additional relief.

And, he says, if you’re up for it, exercise is a good solution. Nasal congestion is caused by blood vessels in your nose becoming inflamed. Exercise will help relieve the inflammation and get the blood flowing again. Try taking a 10 minute walk or do some calisthenics.  You’ll likely feel instant, temporary relief.

Allergy season from a Medical Practitioner’s Perspective

When you’re suffering with itchy eyes and nose, sniffles and what seems like a never-ending need to hack, you probably don’t care what other people are feeling.

itchy eyes, sneezing, allergy season, ragweed season, Ed Neuzil, sinus rinse, saline spray, natural allergy reliefBut you may take some solace in knowing medical practitioners who are seeing lots of allergy sufferers are sharing your pain. They’d like to see their patients breathing easy without fear of a sneezing attack.

“In our office, we are seeing many with a combination of nasal congestion and sinus pressure which often leads to sinus-triggered headaches along with frequent sneezing bouts,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Florida. “It is especially concerning for people with asthma who may experience tightness to the chest, wheezing and dry ‘hacking’ type cough along with increased shortness of breath when active.”

Neuzil says the process for getting to this point is the same for just about everyone.

“The weather starts to become beautiful and people want to be outside more,” said Neuzil. “So they’ll open up their homes to air out the house when, in fact, they’re allowing the bad stuff to get in, such as pollen, dust and other allergic type triggers.”

What to do:

Neuzil says it’s best to reduce exposure by keeping windows and doors closed and using a good HEPA filter on your A/C system.

If you’ve been outdoors and finally coming in for the day, your clothes need to go into the washer, you need to take a shower before going to bed, rinsing out your hair, your nose and your eyes of the pollen and other contaminants you’ve been exposed to.

Remember the longer you’ve been exposed, the greater the change of triggering a reaction. Some people cleans their nasal passages with a saline based nasal spray while other use a flushing system to clear the nose of the pollutants they’ve inhaled.

“The biggest mistake is that many patients when feeling well will appropriately reduce their medication but when exposed to the higher pollen levels, will delay re-starting their medications hoping their symptoms will resolve on their own,” says Neuzil. “However, that may happen in some cases but there’s also the risk of symptoms escalating into an infection that over-the-counter allergy medication might have been able to resolve and prevent the infection from evolving.”

41 Reasons to Sneeze

Sometimes it seems as though we never get a break. For many Americans, the summer has been just an extension of the spring allergy season. Plus, some parts of the country experienced heavy rain which can lead to production of mold spores; yet another sinus aggravator.

Fall is right around the corner and environmental experts are now saying that the Ragweed season will be especially intense, especially in the East.

Ragweeds are flowering plants in the sunflower family.  There are 41 species worldwide (15 in the U.S.) and they are big-time pollen producers.

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These pretty flowers can produce one billion pollen particles every day.

It used to be that North America’s high mountain and desert areas had little or no ragweed growth and thus were refuges for hay fever sufferers. But guess what? Each ragweed plant can produce a billion pollen grains every day. That pollen becomes airborne and can travel hundreds of miles.

In fact, ragweed thrives on carbon dioxide so the issue of Global Warming plays a role in spreading this pollen source. Ragweed pollen is pretty much everywhere in the United States and moving to another region will likely not give you any relief.

So what can you do? According to Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake Florida, you should do your best to avoid exposure:

  1.  Check pollen counts in your area.
  2. Try to stay indoors on windy days.
  3. If you do go outside, remove your clothing and launder it immediately after coming inside and take a shower. Be sure to rinse your nose, eyes and hair of pollen.
  4. An herbal-enhanced saline spray can help get rid of airborne irritants that you inhale while outside.

Still think you’re immune? According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of American, 75 percent of Americans are allergic to ragweed. By late summer, 10 to 20 percent of the population suffers from symptoms such as sneezing, stuffy, itchy and runny noses.

The good news is that the ragweed plant only lives one season and you can look for comfort and relief when the frost sets in and kills the plant.