Posts Tagged ‘non-medicated’

The Air is Dry…so why is My Nose Running?

A comment to a recent blog post about distinguishing between a cold and allergies got us thinking.

During the winter months, people sometimes experience a runny nose. It could be due to extreme cold or from being inside in the heat. You might also experience in a dry environment such as in arid climate or on an airplane.

Why does this happen? We asked our resident expert, Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD, FAANP and owner of the Allergy Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center.

airplane travel, nasal spray, nasal irrigation, saline spray, herbal-enhanced, dehydrated,

Being in a dry or very cold environment can cause your nose to run.

Neuzil says it’s a defense mechanism of sorts:

“It’s a compensatory response by the body in response to the dry air,” said Neuzil. “The purpose of the nose in essence is a filter. It filters out dirt, pollen and other contaminants it also moisture and heat to the air before getting to the lungs.

Basically, the nose is producing increased fluid to do what it was designed to do.

“If you notice many times a person’s nose will drain excessively during cold weather. For the most part, it’s clear and can be very excessive. When a nose becomes too dry it can become very congested as well so the nose will make extra moisture to compensate.”

One way to counter the excessive moisture is to add some to your sinuses. A moisturizing saline spray can give your nose a little extra fluid to keep it healthy while potentially avoiding an “overflow.”

Coincidentally, Neuzil developed an herbal-enhanced, non-medicate nasal spray. Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray essential oils have natural moisturizing properties that help keep nasal passages healthy.

 

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Year-round Seasonal Allergy Prep

seasonal allergies, sinus conditions, pollen counts, nasal irrigationWe know it’s coming every year, sometimes even two or three times, yet allergy season always seems to catch us off guard.

If only there was a way to minimize the annoying symptoms of seasonal allergies without much thought.

According to one Central Florida medical practitioner, there is.

“We know the best way to avoid the itchy, runny nose and sneezing associated with allergies is to avoid the irritants that cause them,” said Ed Neuzil, PhD, MSN, ARNP-BC, FAANP. “Because the likelihood of inhaling pollen, mold spores and dust in the spring and fall increases when certain offending plants bloom, cleaning out our nasal passages regularly can make a difference.”

Neuzil recommends that his patients use a non-medicated saline-based formula every day, throughout the year to keep nasal passages clean and healthy. He even developed an herbal-enhanced solution that helps to moisturize and soothe sinuses.

“It’s just like brushing your teeth every day for good hygiene and dental health,” notes Neuzil.  “Once you get in the habit of doing it every day, you don’t even think about it and it can absolutely make a difference.”

When the pollen levels are peaking, some people may need to resort to using medication to help with congestion but using the herbal enhanced saline spray in conjunction can even maximize the effectiveness of the medication because you’re getting rid of the allergic triggers.

“It’s important to know that over-the-counter allergy medications and sprays are meant to be used temporarily for maybe three or four days,” says Neuzil. “If you overuse them, you run the risk of becoming addicted to the medication and they can even do more harm than good.”

If your symptoms do persist, Neuzil recommends seeing a medical practitioner to determine whether you need allergy testing or other types of nasal therapy.

 

 

 

 

How are you treating Allergic Rhinitis?

nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray, The first step to manage this condition is to avoid allergens that cause symptoms. For instance, if you are allergic to dust mites, it is important to take steps to prevent exposure to dust mites, such as frequently washing bed linens in hot water. The same is true for outdoor allergens. Limiting your exposure during times of high pollen and mold counts may help reduce symptoms.

Nasal corticosteroid sprays (i.e. Flonase® or Nasonex®) treat inflammation and reduce all symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including itching, sneezing, runny nose and stuffiness. Antihistamines (i.e. Benadryl®) in the form of liquid, pills or nasal sprays block histamine and may relieve itching, sneezing and runny nose. But they may not be as effective in reducing nasal stuffiness. Anti-leukotrienes (i.e. Singulair® or Accolate®) in pill form can also reduce the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

Decongestant pills or nasal sprays can be used as needed if nasal stuffiness is not relieved with other medications. Decongestant nasal sprays should not be used for long periods of time because they can cause your congestion to return and worsen. In fact a new website, www.NoseSprayAddiction.com has helpful information for people who have become addicted to certain medicated nasal sprays.

Consider another alternative. Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients with chronic sinus or rhinitis problems without the use of medication.

If you suffer from chronic or acute sinus infections, sinus rinses can be helpful in removing and thinning out excessive mucus. If you have allergic rhinitis, these rinses can bring relief by removing allergens from the nostrils and sinuses.

Your medical practitioner may recommend allergy testing and if appropriate allergy shots if your symptoms are constant, if you do not want to take medications or feel that they are not enough, or if you want long-term control of your allergies with less need for medications. This treatment involves allergy testing to determine your allergic triggers and receiving injections periodically—as determined by your practitioner—over a period of three to five years.

Bad posture is a cure for sneezing.

Like many people, I sit in front of the computer all day for my work. Sometimes, I get so caught up in what I am doing that I don’t realize my body is contorted in a way that is unnatural and unhealthy.

allergies, sneezing, saline spray, non-medicated, sniffles Consequently, I woke up one day last week with excruciating pain that I felt it from my neck to lower back. However, I would only feel it when I took a deep breath or yawned.

I could move around pretty comfortably as long as I didn’t breathe deep so it wasn’t a big deal to take a walk outside. My neighbor had just mowed their lawn, the air was dry and soon I felt that tickle in my nose from grass pollen flying around.

No surprise, I felt a sneeze coming on, followed by searing pain from back muscles I didn’t know I had. Suddenly the urge to sneeze went away.

It happened a few more times until I grabbed my herbal-enhanced saline spray to rinse out irritants in my nose and intercept any urges to sneeze.  It helped a lot although blowing my nose afterwards had to be done gently due to the same muscles being used.

I went to a massage therapist who promptly me told me all the things I was do wrong when I am in front of the computer. The massage truly helped and I was finally able to sneeze the other day.

This experience has led to my new appreciation for the human body. The Body tells us when it is threatened or not being cared for. Unfortunately, we don’t always listen.

It is letting us know when we do not sit straight and thereby strain muscles that keep us intact and on the move; or when we get sniffles from inhaled pollutants.

I now get up and walk around and stretch more frequently to avoid muscle strain. I also use my non-medicated saline spray when my nose first feels itchy so I can avoid further discomfort.

While timing is not always opportune, I would still rather be able to sneeze.