Posts Tagged ‘runny nose’

Avoid Holiday Sniffles

Having a runny nose certainly does not inspire holiday cheer. But a bout of the sniffles can be quite common during this season…and they can be avoided.

According to The Christmas Tree Association, researchers found that conifers can carry mold that cause allergic reactions in some people.

The suggest shaking out as much debris as possible out of the tree before bringing it inside. Another option is to decorate your home with an artificial tree.

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The holidays can often be filled with allergic triggers that lead to sniffles.

When it’s time to store away your holiday decorations, be sure to wipe everything before you store them and when you unpack next Christmas-time so dust won’t irritate your sinuses.

If you like the smell of the holiday, take note before you use artificial sprays and candles. Those strong smells can also trigger sneezing and sniffles so you might want to tone them down a little, especially if your holiday guests seem uncomfortable.

Eliminating exposure to these potential triggers is the best way to avoid allergic reactions. One way is to use a nasal rinse after exposure to airborne pollutants to get rid of the irritants in your nose.

Using an herbal-enhanced nasal spray before you are potentially exposed to the airborne irritants at a holiday party will even help protect your sinuses by moisturizing passages so that you can focus on holiday cheer instead of holiday sniffles.

 

The Air is Dry…so why is My Nose Running?

A comment to a recent blog post about distinguishing between a cold and allergies got us thinking.

During the winter months, people sometimes experience a runny nose. It could be due to extreme cold or from being inside in the heat. You might also experience in a dry environment such as in arid climate or on an airplane.

Why does this happen? We asked our resident expert, Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD, FAANP and owner of the Allergy Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center.

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Being in a dry or very cold environment can cause your nose to run.

Neuzil says it’s a defense mechanism of sorts:

“It’s a compensatory response by the body in response to the dry air,” said Neuzil. “The purpose of the nose in essence is a filter. It filters out dirt, pollen and other contaminants it also moisture and heat to the air before getting to the lungs.

Basically, the nose is producing increased fluid to do what it was designed to do.

“If you notice many times a person’s nose will drain excessively during cold weather. For the most part, it’s clear and can be very excessive. When a nose becomes too dry it can become very congested as well so the nose will make extra moisture to compensate.”

One way to counter the excessive moisture is to add some to your sinuses. A moisturizing saline spray can give your nose a little extra fluid to keep it healthy while potentially avoiding an “overflow.”

Coincidentally, Neuzil developed an herbal-enhanced, non-medicate nasal spray. Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray essential oils have natural moisturizing properties that help keep nasal passages healthy.

 

Is it a cold or allergies?

It is the time of year when fall allergies and colds tend to overlap. The symptoms of each can be similar and therefore can make it difficult to know how to treat what ails you.

“A cold generally is more of an upper viral infection that affects the nose and throat,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Central Florida. “My patients will tell me that they had a scratchy throat that has gotten better but now their head is stuffy and their nose is running but everything is clear. These are cold-like symptoms.”

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A sinus headache could be symptomatic of allergies.

But the virus that caused your cold may predispose you to bacterial type of infections because of the sinus inflammation and mucus which is not draining appropriately.

“That creates a prime environment for the normal bacteria in our bodies to ‘colonize’ and lead to a bacterial infection,” says Neuzil.

Neuzil says it is common for people to run a fever when experiencing these symptoms. That’s a sure sign of a viral infection or cold.

“If your head is stuffed up and you have a headache but you don’t have fever, then you likely have allergies,” said Neuzil.