Posts Tagged ‘saline rinse’

Correct Use of Nasal Spray

Rinsing your nasal passages of the dirt, pollen and other irritants that cause discomfort is a proven to help prevent symptoms related to allergies, colds and other sinus conditions.nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray,

“Many people turn to nasal irrigation and use a Neti pot or sinus rinse for relief,” says Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and founder of herbal-enhanced Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray. “But for those who are adverse to the potential messiness and discomfort from nasal flushing, using a non-medicated, herbal enhanced saline based spray can be just as or more effective, better tolerated with less messiness. The trick is using the spray correctly.”

  • When first using any nasal spray, be sure to prime the pump by pulling down several times or squeeze the bottle until spray is ejected from the nozzle. This is only necessary with the first use of a new bottle or when the bottle has not been used in a while.
  • Tilt your head slightly forward and close one nostril by gently pressing against the side of your nose with your finger.
  • Then gently insert nozzle into nostril. Slightly point the tip toward the outer aspect of the eye on the same side so that the spray will enter the nasal passages. Be sure that the nozzle is positioned so that it will spray directly into the nasal passages and not up into the tip of your nose.
  • Firmly pull down on the pump or squeeze the bottle for a burst of mist. Then inhale gently through the nose to distribute spray deeper into nasal passages.
  • Repeat with other nostril.
  • When finished, wipe off the nozzle with a tissue; replace any cover or plastic cap to protect from contamination and accidental leaks.

If you are using the nasal spray correctly, the liquid should not drip from your nose or down the back of your throat,” says Neuzil.

Neuzil also stresses that the nasal spray bottle is a personal use item and should not be shared with others so as not to spread germs. It should also not be refilled with any other liquid for reasons of sanitation.

Fires Can Fuel Smoke Allergies

smoke inhalation, sinusitis, sinus irritation, Dr. Neuzil's Irrigator, saline rinseSummertime brings an increased risk for wildfires in parts of the United States. Firefighters in western states are already battling blazes while others regions are on high alert for potential flare-ups.

Loss of life and property are the greatest concerns for areas of immediate threat but the effects of wildfires can be far-reaching especially for people who suffer from smoke allergies and asthma.

Dry, windy conditions help spread the smoke over hundreds of miles and carry pollutants that cause sinus and respiratory irritation. Consider that the smoke may contain chemicals from man-made materials which increase the risk for people susceptible to adverse reactions.

The wind may also carry pollen which further contributes to discomfort and can cause serious breathing issues.

Doctors stress the importance of staying indoors when smoke is heavy in your area. If that is not possible, consider wearing a mask.

Once exposed to smoke, it is important to wash your hair and clothes as soon as possible as remnants will remain. Also use a sinus rinse to get rid of any airborne pollutants you have inhaled that could be trapped in your nasal passages.

How are you treating Allergic Rhinitis?

nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray, The first step to manage this condition is to avoid allergens that cause symptoms. For instance, if you are allergic to dust mites, it is important to take steps to prevent exposure to dust mites, such as frequently washing bed linens in hot water. The same is true for outdoor allergens. Limiting your exposure during times of high pollen and mold counts may help reduce symptoms.

Nasal corticosteroid sprays (i.e. Flonase® or Nasonex®) treat inflammation and reduce all symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including itching, sneezing, runny nose and stuffiness. Antihistamines (i.e. Benadryl®) in the form of liquid, pills or nasal sprays block histamine and may relieve itching, sneezing and runny nose. But they may not be as effective in reducing nasal stuffiness. Anti-leukotrienes (i.e. Singulair® or Accolate®) in pill form can also reduce the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

Decongestant pills or nasal sprays can be used as needed if nasal stuffiness is not relieved with other medications. Decongestant nasal sprays should not be used for long periods of time because they can cause your congestion to return and worsen. In fact a new website, www.NoseSprayAddiction.com has helpful information for people who have become addicted to certain medicated nasal sprays.

Consider another alternative. Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients with chronic sinus or rhinitis problems without the use of medication.

If you suffer from chronic or acute sinus infections, sinus rinses can be helpful in removing and thinning out excessive mucus. If you have allergic rhinitis, these rinses can bring relief by removing allergens from the nostrils and sinuses.

Your medical practitioner may recommend allergy testing and if appropriate allergy shots if your symptoms are constant, if you do not want to take medications or feel that they are not enough, or if you want long-term control of your allergies with less need for medications. This treatment involves allergy testing to determine your allergic triggers and receiving injections periodically—as determined by your practitioner—over a period of three to five years.

Rinse for Runny Nose Relief

sniffles, sneezing, chronic sinus problems,  runny nose, nasal irrigationFor people who suffer with chronic sinus problems, this time of year is especially precarious.

The potential for a runny nose increases due to cold weather, exposure to colds and viruses as well as the spring pollen season beginning to flare up.

“Sinus problems are caused by a breakdown in the normal function of the nasal cavity which has a natural protective role in our bodies,” said Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Florida. “The mucous lining of the nasal cavity helps protect against infection from viruses and bacteria. When the mucous is inadequate, sinus symptoms can result.”

Neuzil believes using a cleansing saline spray regularly can provide long-lasting relief and can help in the prevention of nasal symptoms.

“Every day rinsing the nasal passages of the pollutants that trigger discomfort can provide long-term relief for sinus sufferers,” said Neuzil. “Most people bathe everyday for good hygiene and health. Cleaning your sinuses with that same consistency can also lead to a decrease in symptoms and reduced need for decongestants while improving quality of life.”

Some medical providers recommend using a Neti Pot or sinus rinse to effectively rid the nose of pollutants. These methods involve mixing a saline solution and pouring it through your sinus passages to rinse out irritants.

However, many people find the practice messy, inconvenient and unpleasant. This detours them from cleaning their nose on a consistent basis.

“A non-medicated saline spray versus a rinse can be just as effective and better tolerated,” said Neuzil. “There are even nasal sprays available with natural additives which can complement the therapy by moisturizing nasal passages providing even more relief. The trick is committing to the practice on a daily basis to provide more long-term benefits.”

 

 

 

The Annual Ragweed Ritual

itchy eyes, sneezing, allergy season, ragweed season, Ed Neuzil, sinus rinse, saline spray, natural allergy reliefThe headlines are probably telling you what you already know. The fall ragweed season is upon us and it is likely to be worse than previous years.

Symptoms may include itchy eyes and nose, a scratchy throat, frequent sneezing, maybe a cough and just feeling yucky.

Visit your local drug store and you’ll see they’ve stocked the shelves with antihistamines, a variety of saline sprays and more to help you get relief.

According to Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and owner of the Allergy, Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Florida, people who suffer to the point that the pollen is affecting their quality of life and the symptoms appear consistently each allergy season, then they should meet with a medical professional to determine the best plan of action.

But Neuzil also advises taking precautionary steps to avoid symptoms. It can be as simple as:

  1. Keep your windows and doors close so that the airborne pollutants don’t come inside.
  2. If you spend a lot of time outdoors, remove your clothing, wash your face and even wash your hair to get rid of any pollen that may have gotten on you.
  3. Install HEPA filters in your home. They’ll do a better job of filtering out pollen and can be found at most home improvement stores.
  4. Rinse your nose! Seriously. It’s the same as washing out anything else that has trapped dirt and other pollutants.

Some opt for using the ancient saline rinsing system called the “Neti Pot.” This natural therapy involves making a saline concoction that is poured through the nose and helps rinse out nasal passages.

Recent cases of people getting very ill from bacteria in the water got lots of media play.  So doctors recommend that you use distilled water if this is your therapy of choice.

Still, Neuzil cautions Neti Pot and saline rinse users that the simple saline alone can lead to other sinus problems if used too much and he suggests you consult with a practitioner if you use them frequently.

There are other methods, however. In fact, Neuzil developed a non-medicated saline nasal spray that is enhanced with essential oils which help moisturize nasal passages.

Whatever your allergy therapy of choice, it’s important that you don’t try to suffer through season without getting appropriate relief.