Archive for the ‘natural health solutions’ Category

How does a Nasal Decongestant Help?

When allergies strike, there are many options available for getting relief from the nasal congestion and itchy sinuses that cause discomfort. While the symptoms are similar to that of a cold, allergic rhinitis or hay fever can sometimes be a chronic problem that flares up throughout the year.

According to the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology, allergic rhinitis affects between 10% and 30% of adults and as many as 40% of children.

Medical professionals may recommend medicated decongestants that come in the form of a tablet, liquid or even a nasal spray.

saline nasal spray, irritated sinuses,

A saline nasal spray can help soothe irritated sinuses in children without concern about side effects from medicine.

The spray bottle tips are inserted in the each nostril and liquid is dispensed with a pump or squeeze of the bottle.  The user then inhales the liquid and should soon feel their nasal passages opening up so that they can breathe better.

Non-medicated nasal saline sprays are often prescribed by medical professionals in order to cleanse the nasal passages of the dirt, pollen and irritants that cause discomfort. These rinses, usually comprised of purified water and salt, can be administered the same way and the irritants flushed from the nose providing relief.

Some saline nasal rinses have added natural ingredients which can help moisturize your sinuses or even provide a refreshing feeling. These saline sprays can be used without worry of addiction and can even be supplements to medication prescribed by your doctor.

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Saline Sprays Help Children with Sniffles

The cold and flu season is really kicking into high gear. Coughs and sniffles are likely unwelcome guests in your home, especially if you have children in school or day care.  Runny noses, uncovered coughs and sneezes, and unwashed hands are invitations to get sick.

Because colds are the result of a virus, there’s no cure. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, antibiotics may used to combat some symptoms but caution against giving medication to children under two years old.

saline nasal spray, irritated sinuses,

A saline nasal spray can help soothe irritated sinuses in children without concern about side effects from medicine.

Children who are suffering from nasal congestion should clean the nasal passages using a saline rinse. A neti pot or similar sinus rinses can be effective although possibly messy and unpleasant for a youngster.

A saline nasal spray can be very effective and you can find products that have essential oils added to make the treatment more pleasant while moisturizing nasal passages.  The additional moisture will help preserve the natural protectants in your child’s nose.

Show your child how to safely and carefully insert the nasal spray bottle into her nose and to distribute the spray effectively.  Make sure she uses a tissue to wipe her nose afterwards and, of course, wash hands afterwards.

Non-medicated nasal saline sprays can be used frequently throughout the day to provide relief but consult with your pediatrician about how often it can be used.

What’s the right way to blow your nose?

Certain sounds are associated with seasons. You hear jingle bells in the winter, birds chirping in spring and kids yelling with delight when school is out marks that summer is here.

Aside from the rustle of falling leaves, you’ll also hear a lot more sniffles this time of year due to colds, the flu and fall allergies.

Of course, blowing the nose helps with this symptom. But is it always a good thing?

seasonal allergies, sinus conditions, pollen counts, nasal irrigation

There’s a right way and a wrong way to blow your nose.

The truth is that ignoring nasal symptoms such as congestion, sneezing, runny nose or thick nasal discharge can lead to other problems:

  • Nasal congestion reduces the sense of smell.
  • When you can’t breathe through your nose, you resort to mouth breathing which can increase the risk of mouth and throat infections. Mouth breathing also pulls all the pollution and airborne germs directly into the lungs.
  • Breathing cold dry air into the lungs will make secretions thick, slows the cleaning cilia as well as the passage of oxygen into the blood stream.

So, yes, blowing your nose is important but there is a right and wrong way to do it.  If you blow too hard, you’ll cause pressure and some mucus to build up in the sinus cavities. That may lead to further infection.

According to experts, the proper method is to blow one nostril at a time, gently. You should also use a saline nasal rinse to remove excess mucous.

If the congestion lingers for a long time or develops into something more, that’s the time to visit your medical practitioner for a consult.

 

 

Natural Nasal Relief

During the winter, many seek relief from sinus congestion and irritation due to colds and the flu, and the dry air associated with frigid temperatures.

While many over-the-counter medications provide relief, repeated use can result in addiction and possible side effects. Rinsing your nose with a saline solution, on the other hand, is an effective and natural nasal relief option.  Nasal washing helps rid the nose of dust, pollen and other irritants that cause discomfort.

You’ll find over-the-counter saline formula nasal therapies in drug stores, health food stores and pharmacies.  Consider looking for nasal therapies that have natural oils and herbs added to provide further relief.  These natural ingredients can further moisturize nasal passages which helps preserve the natural protectants in the nose as well as alleviate discomfort.

Additionally, some essential oils have natural antibacterial and antiseptic properties which can help protect against germs that may be inhaled.

Nasal Congestion Remedies

Between the fall allergies and start of the cold season, many are suffering.  The runny noses, stuffy heads and sneezing can make it hard to function.

To get immediate relief, try flushing the mucous out of your nose using a saline rinse,” says Ed Neuzil, PhD, MSN, ARNP, FAANP and owner of the Allergy Sinus and Asthma Family Health Center in Lady Lake, Florida. “Whether using a neti-pot, over-the-counter saline rinse system or a nasal spray, you can effectively relieve much of the stuffiness and discomfort.”

Medicated saline sprays and drops will help reduce swollen membranes but medical practitioners warn that excessive use can actually worsen congestion.

exercise, asthma, bronchorestriction, allergies, wheezing, pollutants

A little bit of exercise can temporarily alleviate nasal congestion

There are plenty of natural saline sprays that have been enhanced with herbs and essential oils. They are effective in rinsing out sinus passages while the natural additives can moisturize your nasal passages while even providing a decongesting effect. Best of all, they are not addictive and can be used frequently or can even compliment medicated options.

Neuzil says using a humidifier at night can make it easier to breathe. Add a few drops of eucalyptus oil to additional relief.

And, he says, if you’re up for it, exercise is a good solution. Nasal congestion is caused by blood vessels in your nose becoming inflamed. Exercise will help relieve the inflammation and get the blood flowing again. Try taking a 10 minute walk or do some calisthenics.  You’ll likely feel instant, temporary relief.

Year-round Seasonal Allergy Prep

seasonal allergies, sinus conditions, pollen counts, nasal irrigationWe know it’s coming every year, sometimes even two or three times, yet allergy season always seems to catch us off guard.

If only there was a way to minimize the annoying symptoms of seasonal allergies without much thought.

According to one Central Florida medical practitioner, there is.

“We know the best way to avoid the itchy, runny nose and sneezing associated with allergies is to avoid the irritants that cause them,” said Ed Neuzil, PhD, MSN, ARNP-BC, FAANP. “Because the likelihood of inhaling pollen, mold spores and dust in the spring and fall increases when certain offending plants bloom, cleaning out our nasal passages regularly can make a difference.”

Neuzil recommends that his patients use a non-medicated saline-based formula every day, throughout the year to keep nasal passages clean and healthy. He even developed an herbal-enhanced solution that helps to moisturize and soothe sinuses.

“It’s just like brushing your teeth every day for good hygiene and dental health,” notes Neuzil.  “Once you get in the habit of doing it every day, you don’t even think about it and it can absolutely make a difference.”

When the pollen levels are peaking, some people may need to resort to using medication to help with congestion but using the herbal enhanced saline spray in conjunction can even maximize the effectiveness of the medication because you’re getting rid of the allergic triggers.

“It’s important to know that over-the-counter allergy medications and sprays are meant to be used temporarily for maybe three or four days,” says Neuzil. “If you overuse them, you run the risk of becoming addicted to the medication and they can even do more harm than good.”

If your symptoms do persist, Neuzil recommends seeing a medical practitioner to determine whether you need allergy testing or other types of nasal therapy.

 

 

 

 

Antibiotics prescribed less? Consider pumping up saline spray usage to prevent illness.

This week, the Centers for Disease Control issued a report that further backs concerns from medical practitioners over-prescribing antibiotics because of the potential for “super bugs” which become resistant to medication.  Officials urge more diligence in preventing the spread of infection while encouraging practitioners to avoid prescribing antibiotics unless absolutely necessary.

In the past few years, some medical professionals have been stingier about prescribing antibiotics for symptoms associated with virus-related colds, sore throats and respiratory infections because the medications are only effective with bacteria-borne illness.

If not antibiotics, then what? A saline spray can help ease symptoms associated with colds and viruses which include nasal congestion and irritated sinuses by rinsing away the thick nasal mucus.

nasal spray, nasal spray addiction, saline rinse, sinus rinse, allergy spray, When seeing patients at his own allergy, sinus and asthma practice in Central Florida, Ed Neuzil, ARNP, PhD and developer of Dr. Neuzil’s Irrigator nasal cleansing spray (http://www.IrrigatorNasalSpray.com) will often encourage patients to use a nasal rinse with natural essential oils and herbal enhancements to:

  • Reduce congestion and cough associated with thick nasal mucus and post nasal drainage;
  • Soothe irritated sinuses;
  • Moisturize nasal passages thereby preserving natural protectants in our noses.

“Think of the saline spray as irrigating out the bad stuff that can lead to discomfort,” said Neuzil. “When the mucous is gone and the sinus irritation improved, the patient feels better.  A sinus spray is especially good for children because it is better tolerated than I sinus rinse, safe and non-irritating.”

Neuzil encourages his patients to regularly rinse their nose with the herbal-enhanced saline spray even when they’re not sick, as a preventative measure against illness.

  • It will rinse out dust, pollen, pet dander and other potential allergic triggers which cause sinus irritation and often lead to congestion, cough, itchy eyes, etc.
  • The spray will moisturize nasal passages thereby preserving the cilia or tiny hairs in the nose which trap airborne germs and irritants.
  • Saline sprays will help open up nasal passages so patients breathe easier throughout the day.